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15 Most Dangerous Bridges You Wouldn’t Want to Cross

Most of the time we cross bridges without any second thoughts, getting from A to B is just part of ordinary life but for some people, these crossings can be extraordinary. Traversing a bridge is no big deal when you’re driving over a small river or town train track but these crazy bridges require nerves of steel to cross, from swaying wooden bridges over chasms in Pakistan to icy narrow bridges spanning the Siberian wilderness. These are the 15 most dangerous bridges you wouldn’t want to cross.

Alam Bridge Pakistan

image: Wikimedia Commons

soaring high over the Gilgit River. This wooden suspension bridge is notorious for being one of the scariest bridges in the entire world. We wouldn’t want to try our luck driving over this terrifying bridge linking the Baltistan region to the rest of Pakistan. The crossing was built using a combo of wood and iron rods in 1978. It spans a length of 984 feet hanging over a huge chasm and the Gilgit River flowing below. Chinese and Pakistani engineers joined forces to construct this infamous bridge and today regional authorities watch over the crossing to make sure that cars and lorries aren’t driving over the speed limit. In fact, vehicles weighing over 20 tons aren’t even allowed to pass through. Sounds like that’s probably for the best. One unfortunate truck was using this route when it became wedged in the bridge leading the driver and passenger to jump out of the truck and climb across the bridge on foot to safety.

Royal Gorge Bridge Colorado

image: Wikimedia Commons

The simply epic Royal Gorge Bridge in Colorado extends a whopping 1260 feet across a stunning gorge, yep colorful Colorado is famous for its outstanding natural beauty. There is no better place to take in the view than on this magnificent bridge, but be warned the 956-foot tall bridge is not for the faint-hearted; if you have a fear of heights this spectacular crossing might make you very weak at the knees. The royal gorge bridge is so high that you could even fit new York’s iconic Chrysler building underneath. The wild free-flowing Arkansas river passes right beneath your feet. While standing on this massive bridge only adding to the adrenaline really windy I can barely keep my hat on. The bridge is actually moving quite a bit. It only took workers seven months to construct back in 1929 costing 350 thousand dollars at the time. For seven decades this heart-stopping bridge held the title of the highest bridge in the world. Would you dare cross the Royal Gorge Bridge? let us know in the comment section below.

Mount Titlis Bridge Switzerland

image: Unsplash

This 328 foot long, three feet wide bridge sits proudly in the Swiss Alps daring tourists to cross it for some seriously breathtaking views. The Titleist cliff walk is suspended over a jaw-dropping 640-foot chasm hanging from steel cables and an astonishing 10 000 feet above sea level. Whoa, just the thought of walking along this bridge is giving us vertigo. There are several spots along the way to take in the sheer majesty of the mountains including a trip through an underground tunnel in a glacier cave and the magnificent sudden Finster viewing platform where you can get some cool snaps for social media. If you’re brave enough to trek across the highest suspension bridge in Europe then you’re in for some of the most incredible views in the world.

Puente de Ojuela Mexico

image: Wikimedia Commons

This mysterious bridge has all the ingredients for a seriously scary bridge, not only is it situated 327 feet above a wild ravine but Puente de Ojuela leads directly to an old ghost town where a once-thriving Mexican gold mine has since been abandoned. Is it just us or is this starting to sound more and more like something out of an Indiana Jones movie. This rickety old bridge was built at a 1 000 foot crossing in the Mexican state of Durango way back in 1892 and since then it’s earned an eerie reputation as one of the most dangerous bridges on earth. The pedestrian bridge is just two feet wide and was actually designed by the same team that conceived the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. Today it’s mostly explorers and adrenaline junkies looking for their next thrill crossing this sketchy bridge which has since been reinforced with steel cables. Would you step foot on the exhilarating Puente de Ojuela Bridge?

Kakum Canopy Walk Ghana

image: Wikimedia Commons

Deep in the heart of one of Ghana’s most famous national parks is the astonishing Kakum Canopy Walk. This African bridge cuts through thick lush jungle allowing you to spy rare species of birds and butterflies as you threat as you tread carefully through the tropical rainforest. The Canopy Walk was built by a pair of Canadians who wanted to increase eco-tourism in the region and it was officially opened on earth day back in 1995. While it looks like a traditional rope bridge, this shaky looking bridge isn’t as scary as it seems. Wire rope aluminum, as well as wooden planks, were all used in the connection of this exciting jungle bridge making up one thousand feet of breathtaking walkway. So many people braved this bridge that the wild animals and game and Kakum national park even stay well away, preferring to hide deeper in the dense forest. So what do you guys think? Can you see yourself hanging out 130 feet up in the treetops?

Trift Bridge Switzerland

image: Wikimedia Commons

And we’re back over to the Swiss Alps to check out another jaw-dropping bridge nestled in the mountains. This modern European suspension bridge links the Trift hydroelectric plant to another power plant at the bottom of a huge glacier. The narrow bridge spans over 560 feet of gaps in between the mountains and hangs 300 feet over the picturesque valley. It was first built in 2004 and was replaced in 2009 with a much sturdier version of the bridge which begs the question: how safe was this bridge before it got upgraded? It’s now open to the public; allowing you to traverse the wooden planks over lake Troutsey for unrivaled views of the turquoise glacial waters. Just make sure that you hold on tight to those railings. Despite being refurbished, this bridge still looks a little wobbly.

Langkawi Sky Bridge Malaysia

image: Wikimedia Commons

We’re staying in the mountains but traveling across the globe to Malaysia for this next bridge. The Langkawi Sky bridge towers in the air at a whopping 2300 feet above sea level. This pedestrian bridge hangs above Mount Matt King Chong and is so high up that it needs to be accessed by the Langkawi cable car, yep this 410-foot long bridge curves through nature offering spectacular vistas of the mountain range and on a clear day you can even catch a glimpse at Tarutao Island in Thailand, how awesome is that! This pedestrian bridge might look pretty nerve-wracking but the double steel railings and enclosed wire mesh actually ensure that the six-foot-wide bridge is actually quite safe, although thanks to the cold winds that blow through the Malaysian mountains it can get fairly frigid up there. You might want to put on a warm coat before you embark on this adventure bridge.

The Kuipers Bridge in Costa Ric

image: Wikimedia Commons

Costa Rica originally built back in the 1930s to move bananas by train, the Kuipers Bridge in Costa Rica is now known as one of the scariest bridges in the world. In fact over the years it’s been nicknamed the bridge of death as well as the ‘‘oh my god bridge’’, we can only assume that it was what people muttered to themselves as they crossed this creaky bridge. Constructed by the Bananera Company, this shockingly narrow crossing is situated on the central pacific coast. There’s only enough room for cars to travel in one direction on this bridge and let’s just say that it doesn’t exactly look like a pleasant drive across however to this day the bridge is still used by trucks and lorries who are on the road to Quepos.

Aiguille du Midi Bridge

image: Wikimedia Commons

This massive bridge measures in at a totally mind-blowing 12 500 feet above sea level, yeah if you’re scared of heights then you might want to look away. This bridge is so extraordinarily tall that you can enjoy incredible views of the French, Swiss, and Italian Alps. These stunning panoramas can be seen from multiple viewing platforms located along the Oui De Muybridge and you can even spot Mount Black Mountain; the highest peak in Europe from the highest deck which measures in at 12.605 feet in the air, yikes we told you that this is not a bridge for the faint of heart. There’s even a glass floor that has been drilled in at the top of the towering precipice for a fully immersive mountain experience, double yikes! The name literally translates to ‘needle of the midday’ because when the mountain is viewed from in front of the magnificent church, the sun passes over the summit at exact midday. We’d say that this mind-blowing bridge is a once-in-a-lifetime experience if you think you can handle it.

Vitim River Bridge Siberia

image: Wikimedia Commons

Hold on to your hats cause this might just be the scariest river crossing you’ll ever see, yet this creaky old Siberian bridge used to be a train track, however, these days it lies mainly abandoned and neglected over the wild Vitim River and only a handful of people have ever managed to cross it and live to tell the tale. There’s even a Facebook page set up in recognition of the 34 people who’ve actually managed to navigate their way across the Vitam River Bridge. So how did this remote bridge come to be one of the most dangerous bridges in the world? Well, just about everything on this bridge is a recipe for disaster; to start, there are no railings or nets to break your fall into the icy water below, so you better have nerves of steel before you attempt this journey. Next, you have to grapple with the extremely narrow crossing that makes it nearly impossible to drive across in the vehicle. The path itself is six feet wide and its decrepit metal structure is covered in rotting planks which becomes even more deadly in icy conditions and if you do take a tumble into the water below there is little hope of rescue. The Vitim River has strong currents when it’s not deathly cold or frozen. Over the bridge is 1870 feet long and only 50 feet above the icy depths of the river. We’re starting to realize why so few people have ever crossed this petrifying bridge. It started its life with the intention to be part of the Baikal-Amur Mainline railway; however, it seems as though this project was scrapped and the bridge was left to crumble over time.

Carrick Rede Rope Bridge UK 

image: Wikimedia Commons

This 65-foot long bridge bounces as you step across it, guaranteeing you that your heart will race as you make the trip from the coastline over to the tiny island on the other side. Fishermen in Northern Ireland have been making this journey for over 350 years following the Atlantic salmon on their sea route. They built this perilous rope bridge way back in 1755 connecting the mainland over to this craggy fishing spot. In fact, Carica reed is an ancient Gaelic name that translates to rock in the road. This swinging road bridge close to Ballentoy in Northern Ireland and a short drive from the famous giant causeway attracts visitors from all over the world who want to walk in the footsteps of these brave fishermen and the views are pretty spectacular too. You can even spy the disused Larry bane quarry where filming for the second season of game of thrones took place with 100 feet between you and the sharp rocks and rough ocean below. You’ll need some serious courage to stride across the Carrick Gareed bridge these days. The bridge is supported by steel wires and the beautiful rock is no longer used for fishing as the salmon population dwindled over the years but it’s still a pretty exciting day out for thrill-seekers on the northern Irish coast. Would you trek across this wooden bridge?

Mio Viaduct France

image: Pixabay

Opened in 2004 and costing 400 million euros, this epic bridge is the largest cable-stayed bridge in entire Europe. It’s a whopping 7874 feet in length and 909 feet high spanning all the way across a stunning valley in the Massif Central mountain range. Just look at this spectacular bridge, it’s so big that you could fit the entire Eiffel tower underneath it and still have 60 feet left to spare whoa! despite stretching out over a mile you can drive across this mammoth bridge in just one minute and the awesome Miu Viaduct is the final link along the A75 highway from Paris to Barcelona. Talk about a scenic drive, there are two lanes in each direction and the viaduct is not entirely straight. In order to stop drivers from getting a floating sensation while crossing over the long bridge, a slight curve and a tiny incline remedy any car sickness you might get while cruising along. This enormous bridge made out of steel and concrete and 1500 tons of live wire the Mio Viaduct is a real sight to behold.

Queen Mary’s Bridge

image: Usnplash

Okay so we’ve seen bridges in the mountains, over frozen rivers, and through tropical rainforest, but we’ve never seen a bridge like this. Check out the majestic view from this old iron bridge that’s right Queen Mary’s bridge otherwise known as Marine Bronco stretches 295 feet over the polar river in Germany offering unobstructed views of the magnificent Nosh Weinstein’s castle. It was first built back in 1845 by the order of king Macmillion ii. He wanted a footbridge so that he could stroll over the awe-inspiring polite gorge and so it was constructed using traditional timber however fast forward a couple of years to the reign of King Ludwig the second, the bridge was soon replaced by iron in 1866. Yeah, if you’re going to build a walkway with views of a royal castle then you might as well do it right. In 1984 the bridge was restored for an additional layer of safety but the barristers are still the original ones used in 1866.

Capilano Suspension Bridge Canada 

image: Wikimedia Commons

Where else in the world can you get a squirrel’s eye view of a Canadian rain forest only on the Capilano suspension bridge just 15 miles away from downtown Vancouver. This nerve-wracking treetop bridge is located on the west coast of British Columbia surrounded by towering Douglas fir trees yep at 230 feet high above the wild waters above the Capilano River. This suspension bridge is not for the faint-hearted. Open since 1889 this awesome 450-foot long walkway was bought by native Vancouver residents in 1983 and she’s been developing it for the public ever since. If you can stomach treading across these wooden planks suspended hundreds of feet in the air, then you too will get to experience the wonder of the Canadian wilderness. We hope there are no grizzly bears waiting at the bottom.

Ghasa Nepal

image: Wikimedia Commons

It’s well known for being one of the most terrifying bridges in the world, but that doesn’t stop farmers in the town of Ghasa and Nepal from using this 443 feet high bridge to ferry their cattle back and forth, that’s right this narrow wooden bridge is used to transport cows, goats and other livestock as a shortcut through the Himalayas at 1128 feet long. This notorious bridge is a well-known part of the popular Annapurna trekking circuit and draws many tourists who want to test their nerves on this unstable bridge, yup this bridge can certainly get very wobbly when the wind starts to pick up but luckily the high railings means that the Ghaza bridge is relatively safe to cross. That doesn’t stop the local farmers from putting blinders on their cattle so that they don’t get freaked out by the epic mountain views while they cross over the tiny walkway. Hey, cows get scared of heights too you know.

Bridges we can’t live without them, but that doesn’t mean that they’re any less nerve-wracking, so which one of these dangerous-looking bridges was your favorite? Have you ever crossed over any of them? And lived to tell the tale, let us know in the comments section below, and don’t forget to share this article with your friends. If you enjoyed this article you can subscribe for more awesome content.

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